How effective is the first chapter of lord of the flies essay

Golding depicts the smallest boys acting out, in innocence, the same cruel desire for mastery shown by Jack and his tribe while hunting pigs and, later, Ralph. In the first couple of pages Piggy is chasing Ralph trying to get his attention which is ironic because throughout the book, including towards the end of the opening chapter, Piggy is constantly trying to get people to listen to what he has to say.

Jack, the last main character to be introduced, is described by Golding as "tall, thin and bony His constant attempts to unite the group of boys under the "laws" of the conch are to try to establish the same society of that in the "old counties" and of what they are used to.

In stark contrast, the second character to be introduced, Piggy, "was shorter than the fair boy and very fat". Continuing through the first chapter, after the meeting with the conch, we see Ralph as a natural leader, "there was a stillness about Ralph as he sat that marked him out When Golding introduces the character, he has just come out of the bushes, after suffering from diarrhoea through eating too many unripe berries.

Lord of the Flies, Chapter 1

Piggy, Ralph and Jack are the three main characters introduced in the opening chapter. Ralph, the main protagonist, is tall with fair hair and is introduced first. The adults waging the war that marooned the boys on the island are also enacting the desire to rule others. Golding describes his silhouette as a "creature" from a distance, with his black ankle length coat looking incredibly menacing.

When Jack states, "I ought to be chief" he has jumped to the conclusion that there is no one on the island better suited to the role of chief than he is. Jack is not voted chief and becomes slightly envious of Ralph although nothing is said.

They are all from different backgrounds and represent different things. These qualities Golding describes Ralph to have in this first chapter, and incredibly important for the remainder of the novel.

It also gives subtle hints of what is to come as the story unfolds due to events that occur in the first chapter. Through his descriptive language, Golding uses and phrases such as "witch-like cry", "smashed into the jungle" and "climbed over a broken trunk" to emphasise the not so prefect nature of this tropical island by using negative connotation in his description.

The specs that Piggy wears are a symbol of his intelligence that is to be superior to the other boys. Golding reaches this conclusion of the boy effectively through his conversation with Piggy; "This is an island Individuals that wear glasses have always been considered to be intelligent and smart, and Piggy is no exception to this.

Lord of the Flies

This shows he does not care for the welfare of others, and has no sympathy for other human beings, compared to Ralph, he is the complete opposite, and is not a good listener and it is obvious he jumps into action with out thinking.

Ralph raised is hand for silence" throughout the clamour of choosing a leader, we see Ralph is willing for others to get their say, yet he is still able to have control over the situation and manages to leave the group in awe of him.

This same choice is made constantly all over the world, all throughout history — the source of the grief Golding sought to convey.

From this opening chapter, we can start to see the intelligence behind this shy and reserved fat little boy, and the trouble his brains might cause him in the novel to come.

It demands also a close observation of the methods or ideologies humankind uses to combat evil and whether those methods are effective.

Lord of the Flies Opening Chapter Analysis Essay Sample

He places supposedly innocent schoolboys in the protected environment of an uninhabited tropical island to illustrate the point that savagery is not confined to certain people in particular environments but exists in everyone as a stain on, if not a dominator of, the nobler side of human nature.

This causes Piggy to represent the outcast of society. Through his want for grownups piggy is also a representation of rationality, it is him that tried to take a register and headcount when all the boys are together.

However, when the violence becomes the motivator and the desired outcome lacks social or moral value beyond itself, as it does with the hunters, at that point the violence becomes evil, savage, and diabolical.

Ironically, by giving rein to their urge to dominate, the boys find themselves in the grip of a force they can neither understand nor acknowledge.

His attitude when first realising there are no grown-ups around is excitement, and he is looking forward to the prospect of being free of adults.

They discovered within themselves the urge to inflict pain and enjoyed the accompanying rush of power. The former schoolboys sought unthinkingly to dominate others who were not of their group. Ralph, from the second page, seems to have taken control of the situation on the island.

In all three of these phrases, the impact of the negative connotation is great. Piggy is not a natural leader - he has the brains, but not the courage. We can see this when Golding describes the boys reaction to the loud and bossy Jack: Get Access Lord of the Flies Opening Chapter Analysis Essay Sample The opening chapter is effective because it introduces the different characters, especially the main characters and the themes that are in the book such as power.

Outlets for Violence Most societies set up mechanisms to channel aggressive impulses into productive enterprises or projects.

More essays like this: Jack however has similar qualities to Ralph which causes them on some level to clash. The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters, concerns and language for the remainder of the book, as well as introducing the main themes of the novel; that the problems in society are related to the sinful nature of man and good verses evil.The first chapter of the L.O.T.F was very effective.

It’s written after the Second World War but it talks about the first world, when the children from the city are flown to a hiding place, so they don’t get killed in the war. Get free homework help on William Golding's Lord of the Flies: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes.

In Lord of the Flies, British schoolboys are stranded on a tropical island. When Lord of the Flies was first released inIn his essay A Moving Target, he. The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters, concerns and language for the remainder of the book, as well as introducing the main themes of the novel; that the problems in society are related to the sinful nature of man and good verses evil.4/4(1).

Lord of the Flies Opening Chapter Analysis Essay Sample. The opening chapter is effective because it introduces the different characters, especially the main characters and the themes that are in the book such as power. It also gives subtle hints of what is to come as the story unfolds due to events that occur in the first chapter.

Lord of the Flies Essay example Words | 7 Pages. Lord of the Flies Chapter Analysis Answer Sheet Kayla Plauger Chapter 1 1.

William Golding paid such close attention to each minuscule detail so you, as the reader, can better understand how the island feels and looks to the boys. 2. The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters, concerns and language for the remainder of the book, as well as introducing the main themes of the novel; that the problems in society are related to the sinful nature of man and good verses evil.

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How effective is the first chapter of lord of the flies essay
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